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Five Things You're Not Keeping in Your Car But Should Be

Modern cars are equipped with all kinds of technology to help us when we’re at the wheel. However, there are some things that we can do to help ourselves in a variety of situations. Here we take a look at five key things you should keep in your car, which many of us usually travel without. 

Warm clothes

The ‘Beast from the East’ threatened most of the UK at the start of 2018, and in some places caused motorists to be stranded on motorways overnight. That should be enough to show you how important it is to have something warm in your car, especially over winter. 
Those poor souls stuck overnight weren’t able to keep their engines running for hours on end otherwise they would’ve run out of fuel, and a warm set of clothes would’ve been crucial for keeping both comfortable and safe. It’s always a good idea to keep an extra jumper, coat, or even a blanket in the boot so you’re covered for any eventuality. 
 

Jump leads

Whether you’ve never had a set or lent them to a friend or family member, jump leads are an essential piece of kit in any car. Battery health is something that can be impossible to spot, especially if it deteriorates quickly, and most of us have done something like leaving a light on in our car overnight. 

Flat batteries can be a nightmare if you’re not prepared, but if you are then they’re a piece of cake. You’ll still need another car to get a jump start from, but you can’t rely on a passing motorist to have a set of jump leads with them. 
 

Warning triangle

If you’re unfortunate enough to break down at night, then a warning triangle is essential to alert other drivers that you’re there. Reflecting the light from other headlamps, it’ll help to protect you whether you’ve stopped on the motorway or at the side of a quiet country road. 

To that end, it’s also a good idea to have a high vis jacket or bib, giving you an extra layer of security when you’ve stopped somewhere that might be hazardous. 
 

Torch

Don’t rely on the torch on your phone, as mobile batteries can drain very quickly, and keep a regular torch in your car with you. You can use it to either warn other motorists that you’re there, or for guidance if you need to walk somewhere to find help. 

Breakdown and insurance details

There’s nothing worse than trying to find important details when you need to get them quickly. It’s advisable to keep things like the number for your breakdown company and insurance details on your phone, but you should also keep a hard copy of them too. 

It won’t take long to jot everything down on a piece of paper and pop it into your glove compartment or with your car manual, and even better if you make an extra copy of your insurance details so you can simply hand it over if you’re involved in a collision.